Christmas Newsletter 2013

Our Christmas Newsletter was made in HTML this year (thanks CSS3 and Bootstrap). You can find it here.

Fish Bento

Fish Bento

Chloe’s 4K class has allergies, so the class has to be peanut-free. I can’t stand peanut butter, but she loves PB&J (and it’s really easy, quick, and fine w/o refrigeration) However, since that’s not an option, I’ve had to get a little more creative. I’ve been trying to make her lunches exciting (partly to make her smile when she sees them, partly to make her want to eat everything, and partly because it’s fun)

I made this lunch for her the day after she won a goldfish at the Dairy Days carnival. We bought a companion fish for Adrian, so I thought I should commemorate the two new members of the household. It’s a good thing I did it then, because her fish was gone by her next school day!

The fish are jelly sandwiches, with raisins for the eyes (glued on with frosting, since that’s what I had). The water is green grapes, with blueberries for air bubbles. Then blanched broccoli for the seaweed and flower-shaped turkey and cheese to finish it off. Her favorite part was the turkey flowers, although she told me that kind of broccoli was her new favorite vegetable!

My PyCon Proposal

Building A Better Process Within the Python Community

Applying and customizing techniques used in the safety critical software development to the Python community. In particular pulling from the Aeronautic Industry (RTCA/DO-178B), Medical Industry (FDA 510(k)), and Automotive Industry (MISRA-C).

This presentation is about the process of making software and not the software itself. The goal is to keep the presentation short and leave plenty of time for discussion.

The rate of catastrophic failure on commercial aircrafts and medical devices is very low. What do they do that may be used or adapted for use by the Python community? They have a defined process that is designed with checks and balances. There is a flow from high level requirements to low level requirements to code and tests. There will be an explanation of planning, traceability, standards, and code coverage and how these tools help to create a more complete picture of the software and better assurance it will work correctly. This will be followed by a couple examples of things some major Python communities may want to consider trying. Hopefully there can be lively discussion following the speech to discuss the examples or discuss other ideas.

  • RTCA/DO-178B Overview
    • Requirements
    • Requirements-Based Tests
    • Traceability
    • Structural Coverage
      • MC/DC
      • Decision
    • Statement
  • V-Model of Software Development
    • Advantages of Multiple Disciplines
    • Difference Between Verification and Validation
    • FDA 510)/[ISO9000](http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_9000_essentials
    • The Deming Cycle”:http://www.bulsuk.com/2009/02/taking-first-step-with-pdca.html#axzz1bTzmsWn9
    • Don’t spend your effort with something that will never get approved anyways
    • Prototyping is okay, but it should not short circuit the process
    • MISRA-C:2004
    • Be stringent on things that can be abused
    • Make the process to document using an construct that can be abused more painful than not using it
    • Takeaway simple concepts
    • Checklists
    • Ways to do traceability
    • Idealistic Vs. Pragmatic
    • Your project probably will not kill anyone
    • How can we scale the process to be adequate for the Python community
    • Examples of ways to implement
    • Twisted
      • Checklists
      • Requirements
      • Django
  • Traceability

Given several speeches at the local college ACM. Hold Python and process training for Esterline AVISTA (company I work for).

Senior Software Engineer for an ISO9000 and CMMI Level 5 company (Esterline AVISTA).

I cannot link to actual copies of the documents being referred to as they are ones you need to pay for. I can say the wikipedia articles are currently correct (though severely lacking on actual details). You can add links to those articles if you like, but you won’t be able to see any actual details.

Adrian's Rocking Chair Birthday Cake!

Rockin' Birthday Cake

I made a rocking chair cake for Adrian’s first birthday. I have a whole series of pictures up on Facebook, but if you’re not on there, you can see it here.

It was a fun experiment, and I got to try some new techniques. I will definitely consider doing more sculpting with rice crispy treats, but not for anything structural again. I’m happy with how the bear turned out, though.

Viewmaster Photos from Christmas Card

Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas!

This year’s card features a photo of Chloe and Adrian surrounded by viewmaster reels. On the back, you’ll find two special reels — one about Adrian’s first week and another about the kids’ first year together. In case you’d like to see the pictures a little larger (or right-side-up!), we’ve provided them here, for your viewing convenience.

Click here to go the photo album

Long overdue site updates

I just added a bunch of cakes to my portfolio, so it’s a little more up-to-date. Also, i noticed that our site got comment-spammed, and just deleted a few thousand junk comments.

I’ve had a lot of interest in the cloth diaper pages recently, so I’ll make a point to update that in the near future. I’ve learned a few things since I started that part of the site!

PyCon First Day

I saw a very interesting talk about Python In The Browser. They basically used Silverlight and IronPython. Now they can do script mime=“text/python” and replace javascript with actual Python code. Pretty cool stuff.

Finally

After 4 years on the project, it finally happened.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mf7ARGdyTc

Manners and Ducks

It never ceases to amaze me how quickly Chloe picks up new words and concepts. During her bedtime bath (in between dancing in the bubbles and patting her tummy) she held out a rubber ducky to me and pronounced “Duck!” with an exaggerated “k” sound at the end. Many of her words stop at the first syllable (butterfly is but, ball is bah, etc), but I suppose duck isn’t that far off from “book” which is another favorite word. Anyway, that made me smile.

I’ve been trying to remember to sign “please” and “thank you” to her as appropriate, and she’s starting to get it. This morning I suggested that if she said please, a neighbor boy might give her back her cup, and she immediately rubbed her chest and said “pease”... then when he didn’t respond, she walked closer and repeated it a couple times. Later on, I was changing her diaper and trying to get her to straighten her legs, and I said please (with the sign) straighten your legs, and she did it! (she also repeated “pease” with the sign, which may have just distracted her from her feet, but I’m going to give her the benefit of the doubt) I love these communication breakthroughs.

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